Health Benefits of Cannabis Without Using Cannabis


 

Terpenes a quick guide lower res image

Whether you are looking for a therapeutic enhancement to your Cannabis remedies or whether you would like to unlock some of the healing and pain killing properties of Cannabis without using Cannabis itself, terpenes are a great addition to your wellness toolbox.

For a list of the generally accepted therapeutic benefits of the terpenes found in Cannabis as well as other plants and herbs, Click Here.

If you are using Cannabis medicine, supplementing it with additional terpenes, can be a great idea especially considering some if not most of the terpenes are removed through the process of decarboxylation.

Many of these Terpenes have pain killing properties and can be found
in the essential oils of various other plants other than Cannabis.

You are probably already familiar with aromatherapy and now you probably have a much better idea as to why aromatherapy using therapeutic grade oils can be so effective for pain relief management.

The easiest way to supplement your Cannabis remedies is by using a Diffuser. This is an electronic device that essentially vaporizes water and releases it into the air. It creates a pleasant aroma when essential oils are added to the water and a surprisingly significant amount will enter the bloodstream.

You could also add them to carrier oil such as coconut oil for massaging the oil into the skin. These oils can be added to Cannabis infused topical lotions (these will not get you high).

Another option is to simply add them to a warm bath to relax and relieve aching or inflamed muscles.  Adding some Epsom Salts to your bath can help too.

Please do not ingest these oils. Some are regarded safe to ingest but many are not and it is never advisable to do so.

There are a lot of bad quality essential oils out there and many are not nearly as pure as they claim to be. This is not an aromatherapy guide so it is up to you to do your own research into brands.

We have recommended the Young Living or do Terra brands (where available) simply because we have had numerous endorsements of theirs being quality products. Please do your own research.

If you are interested in learning more about aromatherapy the Modern Essentials 9th Edition is a great book that explains things very clearly. It is sponsored by doTerra and ordinarily we would prefer to recommend a unbiased book but it is good enough to justify its inclusion in this guide.

Please be aware that a very small percentage of the population could be allergic to one or more of these terpenes and it’s very important to test a very small amount on the skin first with carrier oil.  These essential oils are extremely concentrated so please follow directions very carefully and do not exceed recommended dosage.

Essential Oils With Terpenes also Found in Cannabis


Here is a list of essential oils containing significant amounts of the same terpenes found in Cannabis, click the name of the terpene to link to a reputable supplier:

Myrcene

Can be found in:

Mastic

Lemongrass


Limonene

Can be found in:

Grapefruit  –       (92% D-Limonene) est.

Wild Orange       (90% D-Limonene) est.

Lemon                  (70% D-Limonene) est.

Lime                      (65% D-Limonene) est.

Bergamot            (30% D-Limonene) est.


Linalool

Can be found in:

Orange

Lavender

Rose

Rosewood

Coriander


Pinene & Alpha Pinene

Can be found in:

Cypress                (51% Alpha Pinene) est.

Cistus                    (50% Alpha Pinene) est.

Balsam Fir            (50% Alpha Pinene) est.

Frankincense – (38% Alpha Pinene) est.


Beta Pinene

Can be found in:

Galbanum –        (55% Beta Pinene) est.

White Fir –           (25% Beta Pinene) est.

Douglas Fir –       (20% Beta Pinene) est.


Caryophyllene

Can be found in:

Copaiba –             (50% Beta Caryophyllene) est.

Helichrysum –    (5 – 12% Beta Caryophyllene) est.

Clove                     (5-12% Beta Caryophyllene) est.


Eucalyptol

Can be found in:

Eucalyptus –        (up to 80% Eucalyptol – Also commonly known as Cineole)


Humulene

Hops Essential Oil  (Also contains significant amounts of Caryophyllene and Myrcene)


Terpinolene

Can be found in:

Curcuma              (6% Terpinolene)

Tea Tree              Melaleuca

Cardamom

Marjoram


Borneol

Can be found in:

Thyme

Rosemary

Nutmeg

 

Very Important Information:

This infographic has been designed to illustrate the potential benefits of terpenes. Sadly this is a vastly understudied field which is a crying shame considering how many of these essential oils have been used therapeutically for millennia. This information is not intended to treat or diagnose any medical conditions. While we do believe in the power of terpenes we also are of the opinion that Cannabis contains ”safe” volumes of these terpenes.

Not only that but terpenes appear to work synergistically with cannabinoids. This is often referred to as the ”entourage effect”. Essential oils are generally regarded as safe so long as they are ethically sourced and produced and the directions are followed diligently. Several terpenes can be toxic in excessive amounts and they should never be ingested. Essential oils are extremely concentrated and therefore extremely potent and should not be underestimated. Use them at your own discretion and please, if you choose to use them, use them responsibly.

The Secret to Natural Pain Relief

Book

Introduction & comprehensive FREE guide to growing, processing and using cannabis products for help managing chronic pain conditions. Even if you have no garden and zero growing skills or experience.

Always consult your physician when considering a change to your current treatment.

Terpene References and Studies

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12473382

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18711769

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24975100

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19267840

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/iwj.12385/abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23488631

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3654274/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23700426

http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2015/FO/C4FO00807C#!divAbstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18274938

http://www.znaturforsch.com/ac/v60c/s60c0821.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20552523

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21425693

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590926

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24084350

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16008117

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23339024

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16619365

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17559833

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18951339

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2785529/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12802719

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18053325

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24379109

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23126238

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10861965

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15064633

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23702424

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15019181

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23101510

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15477123

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12645832

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15477123

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22978309

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12066204

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24613879

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24641242

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25213443

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22257275

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24835194

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11482764

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24210682

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22717234

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24835194

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22326488

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24488604

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24930711

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18053325

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24370994

http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/papers/23747418

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21356367

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24488604

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01238.x/abstract

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0024320512004870

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/np400828x

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC213895/

http://www.revistas.usp.br/rbcf/article/viewFile/44190/47811

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21350392

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22634841

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15740071

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22364736

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20492298

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22318307

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23665426

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20401670

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7948106

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7948106

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19465777

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8886131

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1470060/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20661827

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9654110

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23665426

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1983154

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1983154

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1753786

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1753786

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2503660/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12587690

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1753786

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1797273

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12587690

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15144499

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12587692

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12587692

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12535857

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16137709

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21299105

http://www.aana.com/newsandjournal/documents/anxiolytic_effects_0208_47-52.pdf

 

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